Avocado seed: a superfood for your health

Avocados . . . just the word can bring the memory of that soft, green and oh so healthy fruit that tastes like a vegetable. The unique nutritional benefits of the plant are enormous; AuthorityNutrition.com reports that avocados “contain lots of fiber and are rich in vitamins and minerals, such as B-vitamins, vitamin K, potassium, copper, vitamin E and vitamin C . . .  [eating] avocados has been associated with various health benefits, such as decreased risk of cardiovascular disease.” So who doesn’t want to dig an organic chip into scrumptious homemade guacamole?

So what do you do with the seed? I imagine you’ve sprouted quite a few with those specifically injected toothpicks and perhaps been fortunate enough to have the right soil and climate for your own avocado tree. But if not, whatever you do, do not throw away that seed, (unless it’s in your organic compost, of course). But after understanding just how to extract the mighty forces from that pit, you may never toss one again.

Natural News writes, “The seed of Persea americana is an exceptional source of dietary fiber. In fact, the Livestrong Foundation’s website calls avocado seeds ‘among the highest naturally-occurring sources of soluble fiber,’ the type of fiber that helps lower cholesterol. If you want to lower your cholesterol and are getting tired of oatmeal every morning, you can grind up an avocado pit and add it to a tasty breakfast smoothie for a super boost of soluble fiber.

“Avocado pits also contain flavonoids, a type of phytonutrient (plant chemical) that has been shown to have ‘antioxidative activity, free-radical scavenging capacity, coronary heart disease prevention, and anticancer activity’ according to research by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. While flavonoids have been shown to be beneficial, it is important not to confuse ‘food containing a chemical with anticancer properties’ with ‘magical guaranteed cancer inoculation.’ Avocado seeds, like other fruits and vegetables, are a healthy source of flavonoids.”

But avocado seeds are difficult to work with, right?

What’s the process of crushing or mashing them to get those flavonoids and that extra boost of fiber?

Natural News states, “You can . . . grind one in a food processor in order to add the powder to smoothies, hot cereal, or baked goods.

“The pit of the avocado does have a very bitter flavor, so adding it to something sweet is your best option. Only use a food processor to grind the pit if you have a powerful model such as a Vitamix; the hard pit could potentially damage a cheap blender.

“Boiling the pits ahead of time can soften them, but it may leach out some of the beneficial nutrients.

“Another option, per Elena Wilkins at Vegalicious, is to dry the seed, put it in a bag and smash it with a heavy hammer or similar. Wilkins also provides a recipe for a mango green smoothie using avocado pit.

“One important point to remember when preparing avocado seeds is that they are hard, smooth, round, and– when fresh out of the avocado– slippery. Attacking one with a knife could lead to serious injury, so be mindful of your safety. Make a fine powder, add it to your favorite sweet snacks, and enjoy the health benefits!”

Say “yes,” to the mighty avocado. It’s not genetically modified yet, and neither are those amazing seeds contained within them.

 

Sources:

AuthorityNutrition.com

Blogs.NaturalNews.com

Science.naturalnews.com

Vega-licious.com

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